Metabolic Syndrome / Syndrome X / Insulin Resistance

Discussion in 'K-O' started by Matthew Capowski, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

    This thread will be used to organize all information about metabolic syndrome.

    For a concise overview of metabolic syndrome I will quote Todd Cadlecott from his article on Metabolic Syndrome: http://toddcaldecott.com/conditions/metabolic-syndrome/

    It has been observed for a number of years that conditions such as adult onset diabetes, hypertension, elevated blood levels of cholesterol, elevated serum levels of low-density lipoproteins, obesity, and coronary heart disease are common disorders that often occur in one patient. Cardiologists originally described a condition, termed syndrome X, that identified patients with angina pectoris and positive stress-test ECG but with no evidence of stenoses of the coronary arteries. Further study revealed that these patients often have a decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In 1988 medical researcher Gerald Reaven postulated that these metabolic and cardiovascular disorders are a multifaceted syndrome characterized by insulin resistance with compensatory ncreased insulin secretion of the pancreas leading to elevated levels of insulin in the blood, or hyperinsulinemia.

    Paul Bergner also has a brief article on Syndrome X titled Syndrome X Notes: http://medherb.com/Syndrome_X.htm

    The Wild Rose Clinic has a Syndrome X Questionnaire that scores your risk for Syndrome X: https://www.wrc.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=75&Itemid=87
     
  2. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

    Sanjay Basu, Paula Yoffe, Nancy Hills, Robert H. Lustig. The Relationship of Sugar to Population-Level Diabetes Prevalence: An Econometric Analysis of Repeated Cross-Sectional Data. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (2): e57873 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057873

    Abstract: While experimental and observational studies suggest that sugar intake is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes, independent of its role in obesity, it is unclear whether alterations in sugar intake can account for differences in diabetes prevalence among overall populations. Using econometric models of repeated cross-sectional data on diabetes and nutritional components of food from 175 countries, we found that every 150 kcal/person/day increase in sugar availability (about one can of soda/day) was associated with increased diabetes prevalence by 1.1% (p <0.001) after testing for potential selection biases and controlling for other food types (including fibers, meats, fruits, oils, cereals), total calories, overweight and obesity, period-effects, and several socioeconomic variables such as aging, urbanization and income. No other food types yielded significant individual associations with diabetes prevalence after controlling for obesity and other confounders. The impact of sugar on diabetes was independent of sedentary behavior and alcohol use, and the effect was modified but not confounded by obesity or overweight. Duration and degree of sugar exposure correlated significantly with diabetes prevalence in a dose-dependent manner, while declines in sugar exposure correlated with significant subsequent declines in diabetes rates independently of other socioeconomic, dietary and obesity prevalence changes. Differences in sugar availability statistically explain variations in diabetes prevalence rates at a population level that are not explained by physical activity, overweight or obesity.
     
  3. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  4. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  5. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  6. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  7. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

    I'm still trying to understand the significance of this: A microbial protein that alleviates metabolic syndrome http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v23/n1/full/nm.4261.html

    A recent study shows that pasteurization of Akkermansia muciniphila enhances the bacterium's ability to reduce fat mass and metabolic syndrome in mice with diet-induced obesity, and that Amuc_1100, a thermostable outer-membrane protein of A. muciniphila, can reproduce these beneficial effects.​
     
  8. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  9. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

  10. Matthew Capowski

    Matthew Capowski Administrator Staff Member

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