Traditional Chinese Medicine Books

Matthew Capowski

Administrator
Staff member
Found it, thank you.

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From the publisher: "The Shang Han Lun" (On Cold Damage), is among the oldest surviving, the most copiously annotated and the most revered of China's traditional medical texts. Of all of China's early medical classics, the "Shang Han Lun" is undoubtedly the one with the greatest relevance to the modern practice of Chinese medicine, and the one most deserving of Western attention. It was the first book to attempt to incorporate medicinal therapy into the medicine of systematic correspondences and channels and network vessels. Far ahead of its time in both theory and practice, it is not surprising that the prescriptions it contains, comprise an important part of today's medicinal formulary.
 

Matthew Capowski

Administrator
Staff member
Found another set of books by a pair of known herbalists (Michael Tierra and Lesley Tierra):

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Chinese Traditional Herbal Medicine Volume I Diagnosis and Treatment

This first volume focuses on the theory, principles, diagnostic methods and treatment modalities that are an essential part of the practicum of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). It is intended to not only provide the background and theoretical framework for the reader to understand the viewpoint from which TCM starts in its understanding of human health, but also gives the reader systematic insight and practical information to permit meaningful application of these principles.

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Chinese Traditional Herbal Medicine Volume II Materia Medica & Herbal Reference

Volume II provides an extensive materia medica and herbal resource organized and developed for the Western practitioner. The book goes on to indicate the use of Chinese herbal formulae and the treatment of specific disease conditions. There are a number of useful index listings including Latin Name, Chinese Name, Chinese Herbal formulas, as well as a general index.
 

Matthew Capowski

Administrator
Staff member
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Written by Cheng Wuji and published in 1144, this is a complete commentary on the entire text of On Cold Damage (the Shang Han Lun) in the Song dynasty order. The entire text means that Cheng’s commentary includes the four chapters on the pulse, as well as the chapters on the prohibitions in the back of the Shang Han Lun. All told this adds another 250 lines of text to what has been accepted in the West as the Shang Han Lun. In addition to Cheng Wuji’s commentary, Jonathan Schell has annotated and translated Cheng’s lines with over 1600 lines from the Su Wen, 500 lines from the Ling Shu, 22 Difficulties from the Nan Jing, numerous passages from the Classic of the Pulse (Mai Jing), and commentary from Zhang Jingyue’s Lei Jing, Zhang Zhicong’s commentaries on the Su Wen and Ling Shu, Wang Bing’s commentary on the Su Wen, and as well as numerous other Shang Han Lun commentators. This books has been produced in full color, where the color has been used to show the attributed and unattributed quotes which the commentators use to illustrate their points. This book also includes 52 illustrations with commentary by the translator, 35 of which were composed by Cheng Wuji and 17 which have been composed by Jonathan Schell. This book illustrates the pinnacle of classical thought, where the reader, through the annotations can trace Cheng’s thought process and apply the canonical texts of Chinese medicine, as cited by Cheng, to the understanding of the Shang Han Lun.​
 

Matthew Capowski

Administrator
Staff member
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The Foundations of Chinese Medicine: A Comprehensive Text by Giovanni Maciocia

From the publisher: This highly successful textbook covers the basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture, and discusses in detail the use of acupuncture points and the principles of treatment. The material is based on rigorous reference to ancient and modern Chinese texts, and explains the application of theory in the context of Western clinical practice. The new edition features new and updated material plus an accompanying website containing over 650 self-testing questions in a variety of formats.

Also see his books The Practice of Chinese Medicine and Diagnosis in Chinese Medicine
 

Matthew Capowski

Administrator
Staff member
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Western Herbs according to Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Practitioner's Guide by Thomas Avery Garran

From the publisher: The first book to exclusively use Chinese medical theories and terminology to guide practitioners of Chinese medicine in the use of Western herbs

• Written entirely according to the theory, diagnosis, and treatment paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

• Explains how to combine and modify the standard TCM formulas to non-Chinese herbs suitable for Western practitioners

• Includes 58 monographs of common Western healing herbs, detailing how each plant is used clinically

The ever-growing number of Chinese medicine practitioners in the West has brought about an amalgamation of many styles of Chinese medicine and various other forms of medicine from around the world. This book addresses the increasing demand for knowledge of how to integrate plants from outside the standard Chinese materia medica into the fold of Chinese medical practices in the West. It is the first in-depth guide to using Western herbs exclusively according to the theories, diagnoses, and treatments of traditional Chinese medicine that harmonizes the unique terminology and theories of TCM with other botanical medicines.

The book contains 58 monographs, illustrated with full-color photographs, of herbs commonly used by Western herbalists. Each herb is grouped by the basic categorization for medicinals in Chinese medicine, such as Herbs that Resolve the Exterior and Herbs that Regulate Blood. The monographs detail the energetics, function and indication, channels entered, dosage and preparation, and contraindications of each plant. The author also explains how to use the herbs to modify standard formulas used in everyday Chinese herbal medicine, based on his own clinical experience. An appendix of Western Analogs for Chinese Herbs further highlights 40 Chinese medicinals that have related species growing in the West.
 
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